Stop Being Interesting, Take These Drugs

A hilarious take on creativity, conformity, psychiatry and mind-numbing medications from Doug Stanhope.

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The Healing Power of the Grateful Dead

In 1977, noted neurologist and author Dr. Oliver Sacks met Greg, a young man with devastating amnesia caused by a brain tumor who could remember no new events in his life. He responded to one thing only: music, particularly The Grateful Dead.

After almost fifteen years of working with Greg, Dr. Sacks arranged for Greg to meet drummer Mickey Hart and go to a Grateful Dead concert! This video tells the remarkable story of what followed.

Dr. Sacks writes more about music and music therapy in his book Musicophelia, including this passage from the preface:

“While music can affect all of us—calm us, animate us, comfort us, thrill us, or serve to organize and synchronize us at work or play—it may be especially powerful and have great therapeutic potential for patients with a variety of neurological conditions. Such people may respond powerfully and specifically to music (and, sometimes, to little else). Some of these patients have widespread cortical problems, whether from strokes or Alzheimer’s or other causes of dementia; others have specific cortical syndromes— loss of language or movement functions, amnesias, or frontal-lobe syndromes. Some are retarded, some autistic; others have subcortical syndromes such as parkinsonism or other movement disorders. All of these conditions and many others can potentially respond to music and music therapy.”

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You Might As Well Change

The best advice I ever heard was given to someone else.

An acquaintance was 30 years old and regretting not finishing college. He wanted to earn his degree but thought he was too old.

A wise old man told him, “In two years, you’re going to be 32. You’re either going to be 32 with a degree or without one. Choose which 32 year old do you want to be?”

Time presses on. Tomorrow you’ll have one less day than you had the day before. In a month, those 30 days are gone forever.

Time is an artificial construct that measures change. We are moving through time. We are changing through time.

Tomorrow you will be a slightly different person than you are today. If you don’t believe me, eat 10,000 calories today.

Tomorrow you’ll wake up bloated and feeling sick.

Although we change daily, we don’t realize it because the change is subtle. If you have a good workout today, you won’t notice gains in the morning. Today’s workout won’t be noticed until several months from now.

Since you have no choice but to change, why not direct the change? Why not take control of the change? Why not change for the better?

To make permanent change, you need to develop one new habit (or eliminate one bad habit) at a time. Three or four weeks of daily practice is usually enough time to make the new habit permanent.

A change can be something game-related, or something that applies more broadly to your life. Perhaps you’ll promise to get one new phone number a day – every day, no matter what – for the next 30 days.

Here is my change: I am not a morning person. I look for every reason to stay in bed. As part of my job, I need to check email first thing in the morning. Yet checking work email often means cruising the web.

Two days ago I said, “You cannot look at anything on the Internet in the morning. Check your email. Make sure there aren’t any work emergencies. Then get ready for work.”

I’ve shaved 30 minutes off the time it takes me to get prepared for work. Whether this change will matter remains to be seen. But it’s a change that I will give a chance.

What will your change be?

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What to Think for Perfect Health

By Wallace D. Wattles
Excerpt from “The Science of Being Well”

In order to sever all mental relations with disease, you must enter into mental relations with health, making the process positive, not negative – one of assumption, not of rejection. You are to receive or appropriate health rather than to reject and deny disease. Denying disease accomplishes next to nothing; it does little good to cast out the devil and leave the house vacant, for he will presently return with others worse than himself. When you enter into full and constant mental relations with health, you must of necessity cease all relationship with disease.

The first step in The Science of Being Well, then, is to enter into complete thought connection with health. The best way to do this is to form a mental image or picture of yourself as being well, imagining a perfectly strong and healthy body, and to spend sufficient time in contemplating this image to make it your habitual thought of yourself.

This is not so easy as it sounds. It necessitates the taking of considerable time for meditation, and not all persons have the imaging faculty well enough developed to form a distinct mental picture of themselves in a perfect or idealized body. It is much easier, as in The Science of Getting Rich, to form a mental image of the things one wants to have, for we have seen these things or their counterparts and know how they look. We can picture them very easily from memory. But if we have never seen ourselves in a perfect body, a clear mental image is hard to form.

Read the full story here…

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Living Without Money

Is it possible to feel rich without possessions? Can you live happily without money? In the documentary Living Without Money, we meet the German woman Heidemarie Schwermer who made a deliberate choice to live without money 14 years ago.

Related article: Money Can’t Buy Happiness, So Millionaire Gives It All Away

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The Joy of Laziness: How to Slow Down and Live Longer

It is the news that all sloths have been waiting for. Scientists in Germany have found that too much exercise is bad for you and that doing less could lengthen your life.

In a new book called The Joy of Laziness: How to slow down and live longer, Dr Peter Axt, retired professor of health science at Fulda University near Frankfurt, and his daughter, Dr Michaela Axt-Gadermann, a GP, say that everybody has a limited amount of “life energy” and that the speed with which it is consumed determines their life span.

They argue that high-energy activities, such as pounding the treadmill at the gym, accelerates the ageing process and makes the body more susceptible to illness.

“A more relaxed way of life is important for your health,” said Dr Axt-Gadermann. “If you lead a stressful life and exercise excessively, your body produces hormones which lead to high blood pressure and can damage your heart and arteries.”

The book also says that laziness is good for the brain. It says that exercise and stress can cause the body to produce the hormone cortisol, which can damage cells in the brain and lead to memory loss and premature senility.

To illustrate the theory that laziness equals longevity, The Joy of Laziness also suggests that early risers are more prone to stress and that late sleepers live longer because they conserve their energy. “People who would rather laze in a hammock instead of running a marathon, or who take a nap instead of playing squash, have a better chance of living into old age.”

Dr Axt and his daughter advise readers that gentle walking, their own preferred form of exercise, is sufficient to keep people in shape if combined with a sensible diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in protein.

“We try to put our own ideas into practice but this does not mean that we do nothing all day,” said Dr Axt-Gadermann. “Laziness should not be to the extreme and work is an important part of life, but recreation and relaxation should not be underestimated.”

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What the Race to the South Pole Can Teach You About Achieving Goals

By Brett & Kate McKay/ Source: The Art of Manliness

In 1910, two explorers began their quests to become the first men to ever set foot upon the southernmost point on earth.

It was the “Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration,” and the South Pole represented one of the last unexplored areas on earth.

Robert Falcon Scott hoped to claim the bottom of the world for England; Roald Amundsen wished to plant the Norwegian flag there on behalf of his countrymen.

Despite their common goal, the two adventurers’ approaches to their expeditions were quite different—as were the end results.

Amundsen reached the South Pole first and returned home on a trip that was relatively smooth and straightforward. Scott arrived at 90 Degrees South only to experience the crushing disappointment of seeing one of Amundsen’s flags flapping in the wind. He would never make it back; he and his four companions died of starvation, exhaustion, and exposure as they attempted to make the 700 mile return trip to their base camp.

Some have painted the differences between the men and their respective expeditions too simplistically: Amundsen as the brilliant leader, Scott as an utterly incompetent boob. In truth, both men had strengths and flaws, and both men made mistakes. And there is much merit in a struggle, even if it ends in tragedy, and I personally greatly admire Scott’s courage and character and his stoicism when facing death.

The outcome of any endeavor is decided by the weights of a scale–on one side lies fate/risk/circumstance and on the other, preparations/tactics/heart. The adventurer cannot know exactly how much will be loaded on the luck side of the scale when he sets out, but he can overload the other side as much as possible, in hopes of tipping the chances in his favor. This is what Amundsen did, and how he did it reveals a number of strikingly clear insights into how we too can reach our goals.

Read the full story here…

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Let Me Hypnotize You

Let me hypnotize you with this simple yet effective exercise, to allow you to see, and feel the power of you awesome mind power… That’s it, relax down, and join me in this little experiment, which you’ll love…

This session was created by A. Thomas Perhacs, creator of Mind Force Hypnosis and Advanced Chi Power. A. Thomas Perhacs has created many unique and esoteric courses on meditation, chi power, qigong, healing methods, and other topics. Learn more at Advanced Chi Power Training.

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